Main menu

Care packs helping vulnerable patients during COVID-19

By Lacee Froeschl | Sunshine Coast Daily

AN 18-year-old new mum who was facing homelessness after being discharged from the maternity unit was among the first to receive a care pack made possible by a local business.

While many businesses are suffering a downturn in sales, Coast manufacturer Quik Corp has donated $5000 to Wishlist to help locals in need.

The money went to creating care packs for vulnerable patients and support Wishlist’s work to purchase vital medical equipment and fund crucial support programs.

Wishlist CEO Lisa Rowe with Quik Corp Managing Director David Wardle.
PIC: Patrick Woods – Sunshine Coast Daily

Made up of food items, vouchers, blankets and other miscellaneous items, Wishlist CEO Lisa Rowe said the care packs were helping hundreds of the vulnerable patients once they are discharged from hospital.

The young mum and a young family of four, whose parents both lost their jobs due to COVID-19, are just some to benefit from the care packs.

“These stories are not unusual unfortunately, but financial pressures are being felt even more so during this time, which is why Wishlist is giving care packs to those patients and families accessing health services that need it most,” Ms Rowe said.

Quik Corp managing director David Wardle, partnered with Wishlist for two years, said the donation came through a give-back promotion and was a way of paying it forward.

“We have been partners of Wishlist for two years now, and saw an opportunity to help during this health crisis,” Mr Wardle said.

“In December, we launched our new Bioweed Weed Killer into the Sunshine Coast market.

“As Bioweed is a healthier way to spray your weeds we thought it made sense to support the health sector.

“So we let our customers know that for every purchase of Bioweed, we would contribute to Wishlist as it’s such an important charity in our area.”

Ms Rowe said the donation was part of the Wishlist Spreads Love appeal, which has seen donations pour in to the tune of $10,733.

“During this time, people have lost jobs, there are very real struggles experienced by a large cohort of patients our staff are seeing in our local hospitals,” Ms Rowe said.